Swahili, like all other Bantu languages, has many nominatory classes. The verbs must correspond in class with their subjects and objects, and the adjectives with the nouns they describe. For example: Kitabu kimoja kitatosha (One book will suffice), Mchungwa mmoja utatosha (An orange will be enough), Chungwa moya litatosha (An orange will be enough). These examples are automatically selected from different online sources of information to reflect the current use of the word “agreement.” The opinions expressed in the examples do not reflect the views of Merriam-Webster or its publishers. Send us comments. Another characteristic is the concordance in participatory forms that have different forms for different sexes: the middle-English, borrowed from the Anglo-French agreement, amenity, by agreeing “please, consent” – -ment -ment -in Hungarian, the verbs have a polypersonal agreement, which means that they correspond to more than one of the arguments of the verb: not only its subject, but also its subject. There is a difference between the case where a particular object is present and the case where the object is indeterminate or if there is no object at all. (Adverbs have no influence on the form of the verb.) Examples: Szeretek (I love someone or something indeterminate), szeretem (I love him, she, or her, or her, specifically), szeretlek (I love you); szeret (he loves me, me, you, someone or something indeterminate), szereti (he loves him, her or her especially). Of course, names or pronouns can specify the exact object. In short, there is agreement between a verb and the person and the number of its subject and the specificity of its object (which often refers more or less precisely to the person). The adjectives correspond in terms of sex and number with the nouns they change into French. As with verbs, chords are sometimes displayed only in spelling, as forms written with different modes of concordance are sometimes pronounced in the same way (z.B pretty, pretty); Although, in many cases, the final consonan is pronounced in female forms, but mute in male forms (z.B. small vs.

small). Most plural forms end in -s, but this consonant is pronounced only in contexts of connection, and these are determinants that help to understand whether it is the singular or the plural. In some cases, the entries of the verbs correspond to the subject or object. Languages cannot have a conventional agreement at all, as in Japanese or Malay; barely one, as in English; a small amount, as in spoken French; a moderate amount, such as in Greek or Latin; or a large quantity, as in Swahili. The predicate corresponds in number to the subject, and if it is copulatory (i.e. it consists of a noun/ajective and a verb that agrees on the number with the subject). For example: A k-nyvek ardek voltak “Books were interesting” (a: this: “k-nyv”: book, “erkes”: interesting, “voltak”: were): the plural is marked on the theme as well as on the addjectival and the copulatory part of the predicate. Remember that a name that ends in s is often a plural, while a verb that ends in s is usually singular: four HomeRuns (plural noun); he runs quickly (singular verb). The term more than one is singular or plural based on the noun it changes.

3. How the verb corresponds to the name depends on the regular or irregularness of the verb. Conventions for regular verbs and agreements for irregular verbs are different.