(d) the conclusion of bilateral or multilateral agreements on the application of the international atomic energy agency`s guarantee system in accordance with Article 13 of this Treaty. Important provisions of the Treaty deal with revision. The Parties undertake to negotiate agreements with the International Atomic Energy Agency on the application of its safeguards to their nuclear activities. The Treaty also establishes an organization to ensure compliance with the treaty — the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America (OPANAL) — with a general conference, a Council and a secretariat as permanent bodies. The five-member Council is empowered to carry out «special inspections». (g) is the institution empowered to authorize the conclusion of agreements with Governments and other international organizations and bodies; That nuclear proliferation, which seems inevitable if States do not limit themselves to exercising their sovereign prerogatives to prevent them, would considerably complicate any disarmament agreement and increase the risk of a nuclear fire, 3. The Agency may conclude agreements with the parties to determine the detailed rules for the application of paragraphs 1 and 2. Each Party shall negotiate with the International Atomic Energy Agency multilateral or bilateral agreements on the application of its safeguards to its nuclear activities. Each Party shall enter into negotiations within 180 days of the deposit of its instrument of ratification of this Treaty. These Agreements shall enter into force for each Party no later than eighteen months after the date of commencement of such negotiations, except in unforeseen circumstances or force majeure. The Agency may conclude agreements with the International Atomic Energy Agency approved by the General Conference and which it deems appropriate to facilitate the proper functioning of the control system established by this Treaty. On 23 October 2002, the Treaty of Tlatelolco entered into force throughout the region when Cuba, the only State that had not ratified the Treaty, deposited its instrument of ratification.

At present, all 33 States in the Latin American and Caribbean region have signed and ratified the treaty. The Treaty of Tlatelolco served as a model for all future agreements on a nuclear-weapon-free zone (NWFZ). Recalling Un General Assembly Resolution 1911 (XVIII), which stipulated that the measures to be adopted to denuclearize Latin America should be taken «in the light of the principles of the Charter of the United Nations and regional agreements», 3. The Parties agree to grant the Agency full and immediate cooperation in accordance with this Treaty, the agreements they may conclude with the Agency and the agreements that the Agency may conclude with other international organisations or bodies. . . .